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Ms. "The First World War"

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page 29

under the General Conference. It seems that the prison officials at once adopted the policy of segregating the Religious Objectors from the other convicts as much as feasable [sic] for work, but for sleeping and eating we were pretty well mixed up with all the rest of the prisoners. Despite the heavy sentences imposed on the Objectors, the authorities soon tendered them a gratifying confidence, as evidenced by the fact that most of them were soon paroled without request or application. This meant that they could go about their prison duties without a guard, could leave or enter the main gate anytime during work hours, by merely showing their pass as they left and returned. The gate corporal made a check of the movements of the paroles, and when it happened that an error was made in the “check in” when the boys came in at night, it sometime[s] caused a lot of inconvenience. One night about at 10:00 the prisoners were all lined up, most of them in their pajamas ready for retirement, and a careful count was made of the entire number and then a recount. We wondered if one or more had “gone over the hill” or what the trouble was. Pretty soon 13222 was called and asked to report to the gate corporal. When I got there, and it was past eleven, he gave me a bit of his mind for failing to present my number when I checked in a few hours before. I tried to tell him, but it did no good, that I had done my part and that the trouble this had caused was all due to a slip of his. In the fall of 1918 they assigned me to work in a green house; not a bad job for wintertime. Our work consisted in raising vegetables for the market. Our foreman was a typical Englishman, by the name of Fisher. He was a civilian, and we worked together in perfect harmony. We were not always successful in our efforts at producing these winter vegetables. For example:

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