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Letter March 30, 1920 from David Eichel to Julius Eichel

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Letter [#12] to Julius Eichel from David Eichel, U.S.D.B., Fort Douglas, Utah

[March 30, 1920]

Dear Julius:

I have your letter #17, in which you say you received my letter of the 5th. You say nothing of letter #8 of March 10th. I have no record of your having acknowledged it in any previous letter.

I was finally "psyched", Saturday morning, March 27. As I have already remarked, only four or five men are examined each day. The subject is closeted with the inquisitor for a period lasting anywhere from 3/4 to 1 1/2 hours. This would tend to create the impression that the situation was of grave consequence, and the test of supreme thoroughness. In reality, they differ in no particular from the many tests of similar nature that we have been subjected to in the past.

Dr. Casey examined me. As I entered the office he beckoned to me and invited me to be seated. I complied with a "thank you" and settled back comfortably for the business at hand. He perused my records and turned at me abruptly with "Do you know Helfer?" I had no trouble whatever answering so simple a question that required so simple an answer. Then there was a few moments of what might have been, under more tense circumstances, awful silence, wherein he again ran thru my records, while I glanced serenely about me. There was a civilian clerk, who cast furtive glances in my direction, but was otherwise busily engaged sorting and filing records. Then the Dr. queried "Do you know Morris?" I was stumped right at the start. "Morris? Morris?" I asked myself, and regarded the Dr. in surprise. "Why I do know a Morris but I cannot imagine how he is connected with the business. it isn't Ed Morris that you are asking about? I asked him. He answered quite engagingly that he was the fellow. This was the one interesting and perplexing moment of the interview. Later when I was asked whether the other members of the family outside of you, we had spoken of you too, agreed with my views. I responded that while I could not say definitely that they did, I could assure him that they

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