Scripto | Revision Difference | Transcription

Log in to Scripto | Recent changes | View item | View file | Transcribe page | View history

Ms. "The First World War"

http://cosandgreatwar.swarthmore.edu/plugins/Dropbox/files/FirstWorldWarPage14.jpg

Revision as of Jul 2, 2019, 10:20:41 AM
created by Ayoder1
Revision as of Jul 2, 2019, 11:09:41 AM
edited by Ayoder1
Line 10: Line 10:
 
On holidays, such as Christmas, Thanksgiving and New Year we usually had company for mess; these were officers of higher rank, such as Colonels, Generals, Major Generals etc. On these occassions [sic] our cooks made elaborate preparations, and we feasted like they do in the King’s banqueting hall. There was always enough left of the good things so that the kitchen staff was well repaid for the extra work they had to do in connection with these feasts.
 
On holidays, such as Christmas, Thanksgiving and New Year we usually had company for mess; these were officers of higher rank, such as Colonels, Generals, Major Generals etc. On these occassions [sic] our cooks made elaborate preparations, and we feasted like they do in the King’s banqueting hall. There was always enough left of the good things so that the kitchen staff was well repaid for the extra work they had to do in connection with these feasts.
 
 
At about New Year 1918 the Depot Brigade here, as a whole[,] was dissolved. Most of the reserve officers at this time received their assignment. This left only the Ninth Company of this Brigade intact. This was now called the Surplus Detachment, and became the “dumping ground” or segregation camp of the C.O. This organization was the home of the homeless who did not belong to any other more permanent company. Besides the sixty C.O.’s who were in this company at one time, there were also a few dozen Non-Coms (Officers without a commission) those of the rank of sargeant [sic] and under. Most of these were the remnant of the original S.D. Cavalry. These non-coms caused plenty of annoyance to the C.O.’s until they were removed in February 1918, leaving us sixty with only a Captain and two Sargeants [sic] in command. Here in the Surplus
+
At about New Year 1918 the Depot Brigade here, as a whole was dissolved. Most of the reserve officers at this time received their assignment. This left only the Ninth Company of this Brigade intact. This was now called the Surplus Detachment, and became the “dumping ground” or segregation camp of the C.O. This organization was the home of the homeless who did not belong to any other more permanent company. Besides the sixty C.O.’s who were in this company at one time, there were also a few dozen of Non-Coms (Officers without a commission) those of the rank of sargeant [sic] and under. Most of these were the remnant of the original S.D. Cavalry. These non-coms caused plenty of annoyance to the C.O.’s until they were removed in February 1918, leaving us sixty with only a Captain and two Sargeants [sic] in command. Here in the Surplus

Revision as of Jul 2, 2019, 11:09:41 AM

page 14

[per]son of the Greek we had the rare spectacle of a man (otherwise rational) being suddenly transformed into a temporary homicidal maniac. It looked dangerous. The wrath of men when enkindled is fierce. How true the words of the German poet:

Gefaechrlich ist’s den Leu zu wecken Zerstoerend ist des Tiger’s Zahn; Jadoch der schroecklichste der Screcken Das ist der Mensch in seinem Wahn.

On holidays, such as Christmas, Thanksgiving and New Year we usually had company for mess; these were officers of higher rank, such as Colonels, Generals, Major Generals etc. On these occassions [sic] our cooks made elaborate preparations, and we feasted like they do in the King’s banqueting hall. There was always enough left of the good things so that the kitchen staff was well repaid for the extra work they had to do in connection with these feasts.

At about New Year 1918 the Depot Brigade here, as a whole was dissolved. Most of the reserve officers at this time received their assignment. This left only the Ninth Company of this Brigade intact. This was now called the Surplus Detachment, and became the “dumping ground” or segregation camp of the C.O. This organization was the home of the homeless who did not belong to any other more permanent company. Besides the sixty C.O.’s who were in this company at one time, there were also a few dozen of Non-Coms (Officers without a commission) those of the rank of sargeant [sic] and under. Most of these were the remnant of the original S.D. Cavalry. These non-coms caused plenty of annoyance to the C.O.’s until they were removed in February 1918, leaving us sixty with only a Captain and two Sargeants [sic] in command. Here in the Surplus